Complete Lack of Remorse – Are We Now Seeing More Types of These Conflicts?

Posted By on June 5th

Are we now seeing more types of conflict with a complete lack of remorse?

Lack of Remorse
The world was utterly shocked this past year after hearing the story of Kimberley Davis, a 21-year-old Australian woman who slammed into a bicyclist with her car. Despite the fact that the cyclist had lights on the front and back of his bike, she still hit him from behind.

Evidence strongly suggests Davis was texting while driving; although, she denied using her phone at the time of the crash. She did plead guilty to dangerous driving.

The victim suffered a spinal fracture, broken big toe, and cuts to his head and body. The victim was told at the time of the 2013 accident that he may be paralyzed. He spent three months recovering in a hospital.

The shocking part of the story, however, is Davis’s reaction. She was livid that the bicyclist left dents in her car.

Davis told a police officer investigating the crash, “I just don’t care because I’ve already been through a lot of bullshit and my car is, like, pretty expensive and now I have to fix it. I’m kind of pissed off that the cyclist has hit the side of my car.”

How is that for no remorse?

And how about the story of the bride who wasn’t blushing after pushing her new husband off the side of a cliff and left him to die.

Jordan Linn Graham, a 22-year-old Montana woman, was convicted for murdering her husband of eight days. At sentencing, she told the judge the incident started when she wanted to confront her new husband about her marriage doubts.

She said the couple climbed down a treacherous slope below a popular spot in a park. They spoke on a narrow ledge, hundreds of feet above a ravine.

She told her husband she was unhappy, they argued, and at one point, he grabbed her by the arm, and she thought he was going to pull her. She told the judge she got angry at him, brushed his hand away, then pushed him.

“I wasn’t thinking about where we were. … I just pushed,” Graham said.

There are many reasons to question Graham’s version of the incident. What is clearly known is that Graham didn’t check on her husband after pushing him, and she didn’t immediately contact the police so that he could possibly be saved. She even attempted to hinder the investigation.

The Judge said he had continuing doubts about (Graham’s) honesty and said he was “waiting for Ms. Graham to say she was sorry for killing (her husband).”

And don’t think that this lack of remorse problem is limited to the young.

71-year-old Max Clifford was found guilty in a United Kingdom court of eight counts of sexual assault against four women aged between 15 and 19.

What was even more shocking?

During the trial, Clifford mimicked a television reporter outside the courthouse as the reporter described intimate details of the evidence and how Clifford’s victims were affected. The reporter even said Clifford had later asked him whether his news colleagues had found Clifford’s antics funny.

Do you have other stories of these types of narcissistic responses to conflict?

Are you interested in learning about managing conflict? Email me: Keith@AttorneyGrossman.com, or call me toll free at
(877) 687-1392 or locally at (239) 210-7516.

What Is a Peace Chest?Your initial consultation is free!

Would you like to develop the skills to effectively prevent conflict and de-escalate existing conflict? Purchase my e-workbook available on Kindle: What Is A Peace Chest?

The workbook is the first in the “Building Your Peace Chest” series. It will help you understand how to engage conflict with a purpose and goals rather than reacting.

 

Email me: Keith@AttorneyGrossman.com, or call me toll free at (877) 687-1392 or locally at (239) 210-7516.

About the author

Keith Grossman helps individuals and businesses negotiate and manage conflict more comfortably. Keith is a Collaborative Attorney, a Family and Circuit Civil mediator certified by the Supreme Court of Florida, an Arbitrator qualified by the Florida Supreme Court, and an educator. Keith frequently lectures and facilitates training programs, works with individuals one-on-one, and writes articles on conflict management and negotiation topics. His e-workbooks, “What Is A Peace Chest?” and “How Do You Build A Peace Chest?“ are now available on Kindle.

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